​Clinical Sensors, a company based in the Research Triangle Park developing sensors for critical medical procedures has raised $200,000 in a private debt offering, according to a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Clinical Sensors raised the money from one investor. It is seeking to raise another $200,000, according to the filing, says Chris Roush in reporting for North Carolina Business News Wire..

The company is developing sensors that hold the potential to identify and monitor patients at risk of developing life-threatening conditions at an early stage.  Its first products are aimed at hospital-acquired infections and diabetes.

In April, the company was awarded two small business research grants from the National Institutes of Health that provide over $1.5 million to support its continued development and demonstration of its point-of-care device that measures a patient’s blood nitric oxide level within a few seconds.

Dr. Philippe Chemla is the chief executive officer of the company.

Prior to joining Clinical Sensors, Chemla served as vice president of business development at Metabolon where he established strategic partnerships with industry segment leaders. Cemla also held leadership positions at Fujifilm Diosynth Biotechnology, Ciba, Novartis and Syngenta.

The company was founded by UNC-Chapel Hill chemistry professor Mark Schoenfisch, who serves as its president. He is an expert in electrochemical sensors, nitric oxide, and bio-functional membranes.


Clinical Sensors at-a-glance

  • Company Mission

Our mission is to develop novel sensing technologies for use in hospital point of care devices. These devices hold the potential to identify and monitor patients at risk of developing life-threatening conditions at a very early stage.  Our first products are aimed at hospital-acquired infections and diabetes.

  • Technology

Our sensors leverage the company teams’ decade of expertise in the design of sensor membranes that are selective for specific species in blood and other fluids, as well as membranes that dynamically interact with native tissue to improve the immune response to implanted sensors. ​

  • Markets

​Our point-of-care devices are designed for use in ICUs and on the hospital floor by minimally trained clinical staff. Our technology has the potential to deliver real-time and direct measurement of nitric oxide (NO) in microliter volumes of whole blood. Nitric oxide is a key physiologic regulator in cardiovascular health, neurophysiology and the immune system. As endogenous nitric oxide production is altered in many disease states, this species serves as a promising biomarker for treating complications routinely encountered in patient care, most importantly hospital-acquired infection.

Our diabetes product consists of an NO-releasing membrane applied to continuous glucose monitoring sensors to improve sensor accuracy and longevity for improved diabetes management by the patient. This technology has the potential to enhance sensor lifetime, improve sensor accuracy, and reduce the number of finger stick calibrations required by patients. ​

Source: Clinical Sensors