TBR believes packaged, “off‐the‐shelf” — or “shrink‐wrapped” — Internet of Things (IoT) solutions will drive  accelerating growth of IoT‐driven vendor revenue for the foreseeable future, fueled by increased availability of IoT  solutions targeted at specific use cases that address specific business processes in industry subverticals. These  solutions are most marketable when they require the minimum amount of configuration, customization and  integration for end‐customer businesses, and most of the business world is waiting for shrink‐wrapped IoT  applications. 

The challenge for both vendors and customers of IoT applications and technologies is that IoT use cases, and  therefore IoT solutions, are far more diverse than traditional, horizontally applicable categories of solutions, such  as CRM or ERP. Because IoT solutions are inextricably bound to the physical parts of businesses, they are different  for each type of business and for each business process. These differences extend far beyond broad vertical  classifications. For instance, manufacturing solutions differ based on the type of product being manufactured and  the type of manufacturing equipment being used. 

Custom‐built solutions work for large businesses

The challenge for both vendors and customers of IoT applications and technologies is that IoT use cases, and  therefore IoT solutions, are far more diverse than traditional, horizontally applicable categories of solutions, such  as CRM or ERP. Because IoT solutions are inextricably bound to the physical parts of businesses, they are different  for each type of business and for each business process. These differences extend far beyond broad vertical  classifications. For instance, manufacturing solutions differ based on the type of product being manufactured and  the type of manufacturing equipment being used. 

Because use cases are so diverse, in most instances, businesses have built custom solutions out of general‐purpose  modules. Custom building is an expensive, time‐consuming process, so most current investors in IoT are large  businesses that leverage their scale. In our interviews and surveys of large businesses that have built IoT solutions,  customers are satisfied with the building process and are getting the results they need, but would prefer to also  benefit from data and development advances made via outside projects. 

Vendors are increasingly offering industry‐specific and process‐specific modules to reduce the cost of custom  solutions. Further, vendors are using their experience to advance the building process so that solutions can be  assembled from kits rather than being constructed from scratch. By lowering costs, vendors can broaden the  available market for IoT solutions. Some vendors, such as GE Digital and Amazon Web Services, are encouraging  both users and third‐party vendors to add their own modules to their marketplaces. 

For most businesses, packaged solutions are best 

The evolution of IoT‐related technologies to include more specialized and more business‐relevant components will  lower costs and time to implementation and will provide more comprehensive solutions. This, along with  increasing experience among vendors and customers, will help drive gradually accelerating growth in IoT. 

For large businesses, assembling custom solutions, especially as platforms and technologies mature, continues to be a good  choice. Not only can large enterprises benefit, because of their scale, from the subtle optimizations available  through custom work, but these optimizations can also give these companies a vital competitive edge.  

Small and midsize businesses often compete only against similar local businesses with similar lack of scale. This is  even truer of governmental organizations and many nongovernmental organizations, several of which could  benefit greatly from IoT solutions. However, because of the cost, time to implementation and resource  requirements associated with building custom solutions, these types of entities prefer packaged offerings. 

Packaged IoT solutions will expand the market to include small and midsized businesses. Some smaller, packaged  solutions are already on the market, and others are under development. Some have been incorporated into  equipment and systems being purchased by SMBs as well as governmental and nongovernmental organizations. To  address this market, both Dell Technologies and Hewlett Packard Enterprise have focused much of their IoT efforts  on their existing embedded or OEM systems practices, through which equipment vendors in verticals such as  power, oil and gas, logistics, and healthcare are building IoT into their products. 

The companies that are “building in” IoT have both the products and the deep understanding of their narrow  markets needed to fully exploit the potential of IoT. They also have relationships with their customers or with the  channel to their customers. As a result, they are often best suited to deliver aftermarket IoT solutions, adding IoT  capabilities and services to in‐place equipment.  

The fragmented IoT market leads to slowly accelerating growth 

Each IoT solution comes to market at a different time, meaning that as more packaged solutions become available  and as some experience rapid growth, the total growth accelerates. The IoT market has been described as a  “popcorn” market, in which each submarket “pops” at its own pace — some smaller markets grow explosively, but  the total market (the “pot of popcorn”) expands more uniformly.

As a result, and as providers of the horizontal components that go into specific solutions have witnessed, the IoT  market has not seen the sudden growth many expected. While this is frustrating to companies that planned for a  rapid wave of adoption, the upside of this trend is that growth will gradually accelerate for at least five years. TBR  is not yet predicting the point at which growth will start to slow. 

Vendors of horizontal IoT components are challenged to reach their market — companies building packaged IoT  solutions — because the buyers are not IT departments but rather product development organizations. Despite  the fact that the components are broadly applicable, the buying market for packaged IoT solutions is much more  diverse than that for conventional IT solutions. At the same time, potential buyers face a challenge finding vendors  for their solutions. The market in which component vendors are selling to solutions providers is currently evolving,  and its growth is contributing to IoT growth. 

(C) TBR