In today’s Bulldog wrapup of technology news:

  • HP Enterprise is selling its services group
  • Microsoft cuts jobs in mobile unit
  • Toyota decides to invest in Uber
  • A new report says the federal government is spending billions on antiquated technology

The details:

  • HP Enterprise gets smaller by selling services division

Hewlett Packard Enterprise is continuing to slim down by selling its business services division to competitor Computer Sciences Corp.

Both companies said the deal is worth about $8.5 billion to shareholders in HP Enterprise, one of two companies formed last year by the breakup of struggling tech giant Hewlett-Packard, Inc.

HP Enterprise, based in Palo Alto, California, will now concentrate on selling data center hardware, software and other commercial tech gear to big organizations. It’s spinning off a technology outsourcing and management services business that includes operations the old HP acquired when it bought Electronic Data Systems Inc., for nearly $14 billion in 2008.

CEO Meg Whitman said the “enterprise services” division helped bring in customers. With roughly 100,000 employees, it contributes more than a third of HPE’s revenue. But the division has lagged other segments in both growth and profit. Analysts say some of the operations acquired from EDS were outdated.

Whitman announced the deal Tuesday as HP Enterprise reported better-than-expected revenue for its fiscal quarter ended April 30.

Investors liked the news: HP Enterprise stock rose more than 10 percent in after-hours trading after the deal was announced. Shares in CSC surged more than 27 percent.

Whitman has been trying to overhaul a once-mighty tech conglomerate since she became chief executive of the old HP in 2011. Nearly a decade ago, the old HP led the tech industry with annual sales above $100 billion, boosted by several large acquisitions including EDS and the personal-computer maker Compaq.

But the company struggled to keep up with industry trends, as consumers bought fewer PCs and businesses shifted to new models of commercial computing. Whitman oversaw a split last year that led to the creation of HP Enterprise and a second company, HP Inc., that’s focused on selling PCs and printers.

Spinning off the services division will leave HPE with businesses producing about $33 billion in annual revenue, the company said Tuesday. It said the deal should boost annual revenue for Tysons, Virginia-based CSC to about $26 billion. HPE shareholders will get a cash dividend of $1.5 billion and a 50 percent stake in CSC, which will assume about $2.5 billion in debt and other liabilities.

  • Microsoft cuts more jobs in troubled mobile unit

Microsoft will cut up to 1,850 jobs and book an approximately $950 million writed own as it attempts to salvage its rocky entrance into the smartphone market.

The company acquired Nokia’s phone business in 2014 for $7.3 billion, seeking to capitalize on and the fast-growing industry. But by last summer it had slashed the value of that business severely and it eliminated 26,000 jobs.

Microsoft, under former CEO Steve Ballmer, attempted to leverage its software knowh ow to take on increasingly powerful tech rivals, but the company has beat a quick retreat under new CEO Satya Nadella, with the venture taking on water.

Nadella has redirected Microsoft to better focus on software and Internet services.

The bulk of the jobs cuts announced Wednesday, up to 1,350 positions — are at Microsoft Mobile Oy in Finland. There will also be up to 500 additional jobs trimmed worldwide. Microsoft had 117,354 employees globally at the end of its last fiscal year.

Microsoft Corp., based in Redmond, Washington, hopes to complete most of the “streamlining” by year’s end.

  • Toyota to invest in ride-hailing app Uber

Toyota said Tuesday it is investing in Uber, making it the latest car company to put money in a ride-hailing app.

The Japanese company did not say how much the investment is worth.

As part of the deal, Uber drivers can lease Toyota vehicles with money earned from their driving.

Investing in ride-hailing services can be a way for automakers to sell more cars. Earlier this year, General Motors Co. invested $500 million in Uber rival Lyft.

Uber relies on drivers who use their own cars to give customers rides. Riders request and pay for their rides through the Uber phone app. The company has entered more than four hundred cities around the world, despite pushback from regulators and the taxi industry about how it vets drivers.

Toyota is investing in San Francisco-based Uber alongside Mirai Creation Investment Limited Partnership, an investment fund backed by Toyota and Japanese bank Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corp.

  • Report: Feds spend billions to run ancient technology

The government is spending about three-fourths of its technology budget maintaining aging computer systems, including platforms more than 50 years old in vital areas from nuclear weapons to Social Security. One still uses floppy disks.

In a report to be released Wednesday, nonpartisan congressional investigators say the increasing cost of maintaining museum-ready equipment devours money better spent on modernization.

Despite a White House push to replace aging workhorse systems, the budget for modernization has fallen, and will be $7 billion less in 2017 than in 2010, said the Government Accountability Office. The report was provided to The Associated Press ahead of a House oversight committee hearing.

GAO said it found problems across the government, not just in a few agencies. Among those highlighted in the report:

— The Defense Department’s Strategic Automated Command and Control System, which is used to send and receive emergency action messages to U.S. nuclear forces. The system is running on a 1970s IBM computing platform, and still uses 8-inch floppy disks to store data. “Replacement parts for the system are difficult to find because they are now obsolete,” GAO said. The Pentagon is initiating a full replacement and says the floppy disks should be gone by the end of next year. The entire upgrade will take longer.

— Treasury’s individual and business master files, the authoritative data sources for taxpayer information. The systems are about 56 years old, and use an outdated computer language that is difficult to write and maintain. Treasury plans to replace the systems, but has no firm dates.

— Social Security systems that are used to determine eligibility and estimate benefits, about 31 years old. Some use a programming language called COBOL, dating to the late 1950s and early 1960s. “Most of the employees who developed these systems are ready to retire and the agency will lose their collective knowledge,” the report said. “Training new employees to maintain the older systems takes a lot of time.” Social Security has no plans to replace the entire system, but is eliminating and upgrading older and costlier components. It is also rehiring retirees who know the technology.

— Medicare’s Appeals System, which is only 11 years old, but facing challenges keeping up with a growing number of appeals, as well as questions from congressional offices following up on constituent concerns. The report says the agency has general plans to keep updating the system, depending on the availability of funds.

— The Transportation Department’s Hazardous Materials Information System, used to track incidents and keep information relied on by regulators. The system is about 41 years old, and some of its software is no longer supported by vendors, which can create security risks. The department plans to complete its modernization program in 2018.

GAO estimates that the government spent at least $80 billion on information technology, or IT, in 2015. However, the total could be significantly higher. Not counted in the reportare certain Pentagon systems, as well as those run by independent agencies, among them the CIA. Major systems are known as “IT investments” in government jargon.

“Legacy federal IT investments are becoming obsolete,” GAO concluded. “The federal government runs the risk of continuing to maintain investments that have outlived their effectiveness and are consuming resources that outweigh their benefits.”