Maggie Wilderotter, chairman and CEO at Frontier Communications, is blasting renewed calls for “net neutrality” in the ongoing Internet access debate.

“The Internet, which has thrived under a light touch regulatory approach, will stagnate under a regime developed for monopoly common carrier providers,” she warned Wednesday.

“Despite [Frontier’s] private capital commitment [of more than $2.8 billion], some ‘net neutrality’ instigators are urging regulators to adopt rules for the internet based on an outdated and burdensome 20th century regulatory framework.”

Frontier is building out a fiber network in Durham and Durham County. 

Wilderotter’s comments came after President Obama called for the FCC to regulate the Internet and Internet Service Providers on Monday.

AT&T responded by threatening legal action then on Wednesday it’s CEO declared a “pause” in further fiber deployments. That decision apparently will affect the North Carolina Next Generation Network, which AT&T is under contract to build in the Triangle and Winston-Salem.

Frontier recently deployed gigabit-Internet connectivity and upgraded Wi-Fi connectivity at the American Tobacco Historic District and the Durham Athletic Park, home of the Durham Bulls.

Wilderotter recently visited Durham to announce the launch of its fiber network in Durham and Durham County, becoming the first service provider to offer such access in the Triangle.

The FCC is mulling a strategy for Internet regulation that would survive legal scrutiny. Courts rejected a recent attempt.

Wilderotter defended Frontier’s Internet strategy and said regulation would hamper network development.

Her full statement:

“Over the last four years, Frontier has invested more than $2.8 billion to provide broadband, voice, and video services to our customers. Our network delivers valued services across our 28 states and offers unfettered access to the Internet. Despite this private capital commitment, some ‘net neutrality’ instigators are urging regulators to adopt rules for the internet based on an outdated and burdensome 20th century regulatory framework,” she said.

“The internet, which has thrived under a light touch regulatory approach, will stagnate under a regime developed for monopoly common carrier providers.”

“Frontier embraces the existing industry supported framework for an open internet and supports transparency because we believe a fully-informed customer is the best customer. We do not block or degrade customer access to content and we have no fast lanes.

“Yet we find that ‘net neutrality’ advocates are urging new rules and regulations that will drive up our costs, create uncertainty, deter investment and degrade the customer internet experience. This is exactly the wrong approach for our country as we rely on innovation to create jobs and we face a challenging global economic environment.”