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A roundup of the latest high-tech news “Hot Off the Wire” from The Associated Press and Local Tech Wire:

• N.Y. man claims 84% ownership of Facebook

BUFFALO, N.Y. — Facebook will try to get a New York man’s claim for majority ownership of the website thrown out of court, attorneys for the social networking site said Tuesday.

A complaint by Paul Ceglia of Wellsville claims that a 7-year-old contract he signed with Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg for software development entitles him to 84 percent of the company.

"No one’s ever said it’s not his signature or it’s a fake contract," Ceglia attorney Terrence Connors said during a federal court hearing in Buffalo.

Connors said the two men met when Zuckerberg, then a Harvard University freshman, responded to an ad Ceglia had posted on Craigslist looking for someone to develop software for a street-mapping database he was creating.

Zuckerberg offered to take on Ceglia’s project for $1,000, Connors said, and then told Ceglia about a project of his own, a kind of online yearbook for Harvard students that he wanted to expand.

Ceglia said he gave Zuckerberg another $1,000 to continue work on Zuckerberg’s "The Face Book," with the condition that Ceglia would own a 50 percent interest in the software and business if it expanded. The percentage grew to 84 percent based on a clause that added a percentage point for each day the project went past its Jan. 1, 2004, due date.

At the center of Ceglia’s claim is a two-page "work for hire" contract bearing the names of both men.

Facebook attorney Lisa Simpson acknowledged on Tuesday that Zuckerberg and Ceglia had worked together on the street-mapping website but said the contract submitted by Ceglia was full of "inconsistencies, undefined terms and things that don’t make sense."

In 2008, Palo Alto, Calif.-based Facebook settled a lawsuit over its origins brought by three of Zuckerberg’s former Harvard classmates, who claimed he turned their idea into Facebook after they hired him to work on a website that later became ConnectU.

• SAP receives final OK for Sybase acquisition

NEW YORK — German business software maker SAP AG said Tuesday that European regulators have approved its $5.8 billion takeover of U.S. database software maker Sybase Inc.

SAP said clearance from the European Commission was the final regulatory hurdle.

The company has extended the deadline on its tender offer of $65 per share several times while it waited for the OK. The offer now expires at 9 p.m. on July 26.

• Netflix to expand to Canada

SAN FRANCISCO — Netflix Inc. will make its international debut this fall when the rapidly growing movie subscription service offers video over the Internet in Canada.

The announcement resolves the mystery of where Netflix will take its first step outside the United States. The company had laid out plans to move beyond the U.S. borders earlier this year without identifying a target market.

The question of how much the Canadian service will cost remains unanswered. Netflix’s most popular packages in the U.S. cost $9 to $17 per month. The company, which is based in Los Gatos, Calif., could provide more details Wednesday when it’s scheduled to release its second-quarter earnings.

This will mark the first time that Netflix has offered a service confined to delivering video over high-speed Internet connections. All its U.S. subscription packages combine Internet streaming with DVDs delivered through the mail.

DVDs remain the most popular feature among Netflix’s 14 million subscribers, although Internet streaming is steadily gaining usage as Netflix makes more titles available for digital delivery and more households connect their TVs to the Web.