Get the latest news alerts: at Twitter.

A roundup of the latest high-tech news “Hot Off the Wire” from The Associated Press and Local Tech Wire:

• Government plans to double available wireless spectrum

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration intends to nearly double the available amount of wireless communications spectrum over the next 10 years in an effort to keep up with the ever-growing demand for high-speed video and data transmission to cell phones, laptops and other mobile devices.

President Barack Obama on Monday committed the federal government to auctioning off 500 megahertz of federal and commercial spectrum. Revenue from the auctions would be spent on public safety, infrastructure investments and deficit reduction.

In a memo to heads of federal agencies and departments, Obama said he wanted to unleash the full potential of wireless broadband and spur innovation.

"This new era in global technology leadership will only happen if there is adequate spectrum available to support the forthcoming myriad of wireless devices, networks and applications that can drive the new economy," Obama wrote.

National Economic Council director Lawrence H. Summers was to explain the new policy in a speech Monday at the New America Foundation, a Washington think tank. In an excerpt released by the White House, Summers said the initiative could "help to create hundreds of thousands of jobs."

The administration said it hopes to encourage the spread of wireless broadband across the country, including rural areas. The auction is intended, in part, to counter fears of a potential "spectrum crunch" as smart phones and laptop computers become more popular and new wireless devices hit the market.

• Startup offers music roaming through ‘cloud’ computing

NEW YORK — A new music service launching Monday lets you listen to your music collection from any computer or Android phone over the Web.

service stores your music on its computers and lets you access it remotely through a Web browser. It’s a concept known as "cloud computing," and it’s also popular with music subscription services such as Rhapsody and Thumbplay.

MSpot is free for 2 gigabytes of music, or about 1,600 songs , and charges $3 to $14 for up to 100 gigabytes extra storage.

It detects cellular network conditions and adapts playback so that your tunes don’t get interrupted because of spotty coverage. An "airplane mode" allows you to play songs you’ve preselected, without Internet access.

• EU, U.S. settle on financial data in suspected terrorist cases

BRUSSELS — The European Union and U.S. signed a long-awaited deal Monday to share financial data in suspected terrorist cases, after the U.S. agreed to major concessions to allay European concerns over privacy.

The five-year agreement is due to take effect within weeks. It allows U.S. officials to request financial data from European banks if they suspect accounts are being used by individuals with terrorist links. The U.S. can keep that information for five years.

However, U.S. officials must provide European authorities with reasons for their suspicions, delete or rectify inaccurate data and grant legal redress in U.S. courts if financial information is abused. The agreement also sets out criteria for transferring data to third countries.

The accord is designed to head off disagreements between the U.S. and EU over where personal privacy takes precedence over security investigations. The European Parliament last year rejected extending an interim deal because it said there were not enough safeguards for civil liberties.

European officials were angered by the 2006 disclosure of the U.S. Terrorist Finance Tracking Program, a secret program launched after the 9/11 attacks that gave U.S. authorities access to European financial data through SWIFT, the banking consortium that handles global electronic banking transfers.

The new accord deals with the same data but sets limits on how and why it is shared.

The agreement also requires an EU official to be present when U.S. counterterrorism officials receive the data from banks.
Get the latest news alerts: at Twitter.

A roundup of the latest high-tech news “Hot Off the Wire” from The Associated Press and Local Tech Wire:

• Government plans to double available wireless spectrum

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration intends to nearly double the available amount of wireless communications spectrum over the next 10 years in an effort to keep up with the ever-growing demand for high-speed video and data transmission to cell phones, laptops and other mobile devices.

President Barack Obama on Monday committed the federal government to auctioning off 500 megahertz of federal and commercial spectrum. Revenue from the auctions would be spent on public safety, infrastructure investments and deficit reduction.

In a memo to heads of federal agencies and departments, Obama said he wanted to unleash the full potential of wireless broadband and spur innovation.

"This new era in global technology leadership will only happen if there is adequate spectrum available to support the forthcoming myriad of wireless devices, networks and applications that can drive the new economy," Obama wrote.

National Economic Council director Lawrence H. Summers was to explain the new policy in a speech Monday at the New America Foundation, a Washington think tank. In an excerpt released by the White House, Summers said the initiative could "help to create hundreds of thousands of jobs."

The administration said it hopes to encourage the spread of wireless broadband across the country, including rural areas. The auction is intended, in part, to counter fears of a potential "spectrum crunch" as smart phones and laptop computers become more popular and new wireless devices hit the market.

• Startup offers music roaming through ‘cloud’ computing

NEW YORK — A new music service launching Monday lets you listen to your music collection from any computer or Android phone over the Web.

service stores your music on its computers and lets you access it remotely through a Web browser. It’s a concept known as "cloud computing," and it’s also popular with music subscription services such as Rhapsody and Thumbplay.

MSpot is free for 2 gigabytes of music, or about 1,600 songs , and charges $3 to $14 for up to 100 gigabytes extra storage.

It detects cellular network conditions and adapts playback so that your tunes don’t get interrupted because of spotty coverage. An "airplane mode" allows you to play songs you’ve preselected, without Internet access.

• EU, U.S. settle on financial data in suspected terrorist cases

BRUSSELS — The European Union and U.S. signed a long-awaited deal Monday to share financial data in suspected terrorist cases, after the U.S. agreed to major concessions to allay European concerns over privacy.

The five-year agreement is due to take effect within weeks. It allows U.S. officials to request financial data from European banks if they suspect accounts are being used by individuals with terrorist links. The U.S. can keep that information for five years.

However, U.S. officials must provide European authorities with reasons for their suspicions, delete or rectify inaccurate data and grant legal redress in U.S. courts if financial information is abused. The agreement also sets out criteria for transferring data to third countries.

The accord is designed to head off disagreements between the U.S. and EU over where personal privacy takes precedence over security investigations. The European Parliament last year rejected extending an interim deal because it said there were not enough safeguards for civil liberties.

European officials were angered by the 2006 disclosure of the U.S. Terrorist Finance Tracking Program, a secret program launched after the 9/11 attacks that gave U.S. authorities access to European financial data through SWIFT, the banking consortium that handles global electronic banking transfers.

The new accord deals with the same data but sets limits on how and why it is shared.

The agreement also requires an EU official to be present when U.S. counterterrorism officials receive the data from banks.
Get the latest news alerts: at Twitter.

A roundup of the latest high-tech news “Hot Off the Wire” from The Associated Press and Local Tech Wire:

• Government plans to double available wireless spectrum

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration intends to nearly double the available amount of wireless communications spectrum over the next 10 years in an effort to keep up with the ever-growing demand for high-speed video and data transmission to cell phones, laptops and other mobile devices.

President Barack Obama on Monday committed the federal government to auctioning off 500 megahertz of federal and commercial spectrum. Revenue from the auctions would be spent on public safety, infrastructure investments and deficit reduction.

In a memo to heads of federal agencies and departments, Obama said he wanted to unleash the full potential of wireless broadband and spur innovation.

"This new era in global technology leadership will only happen if there is adequate spectrum available to support the forthcoming myriad of wireless devices, networks and applications that can drive the new economy," Obama wrote.

National Economic Council director Lawrence H. Summers was to explain the new policy in a speech Monday at the New America Foundation, a Washington think tank. In an excerpt released by the White House, Summers said the initiative could "help to create hundreds of thousands of jobs."

The administration said it hopes to encourage the spread of wireless broadband across the country, including rural areas. The auction is intended, in part, to counter fears of a potential "spectrum crunch" as smart phones and laptop computers become more popular and new wireless devices hit the market.

• Startup offers music roaming through ‘cloud’ computing

NEW YORK — A new music service launching Monday lets you listen to your music collection from any computer or Android phone over the Web.

service stores your music on its computers and lets you access it remotely through a Web browser. It’s a concept known as "cloud computing," and it’s also popular with music subscription services such as Rhapsody and Thumbplay.

MSpot is free for 2 gigabytes of music, or about 1,600 songs , and charges $3 to $14 for up to 100 gigabytes extra storage.

It detects cellular network conditions and adapts playback so that your tunes don’t get interrupted because of spotty coverage. An "airplane mode" allows you to play songs you’ve preselected, without Internet access.

• EU, U.S. settle on financial data in suspected terrorist cases

BRUSSELS — The European Union and U.S. signed a long-awaited deal Monday to share financial data in suspected terrorist cases, after the U.S. agreed to major concessions to allay European concerns over privacy.

The five-year agreement is due to take effect within weeks. It allows U.S. officials to request financial data from European banks if they suspect accounts are being used by individuals with terrorist links. The U.S. can keep that information for five years.

However, U.S. officials must provide European authorities with reasons for their suspicions, delete or rectify inaccurate data and grant legal redress in U.S. courts if financial information is abused. The agreement also sets out criteria for transferring data to third countries.

The accord is designed to head off disagreements between the U.S. and EU over where personal privacy takes precedence over security investigations. The European Parliament last year rejected extending an interim deal because it said there were not enough safeguards for civil liberties.

European officials were angered by the 2006 disclosure of the U.S. Terrorist Finance Tracking Program, a secret program launched after the 9/11 attacks that gave U.S. authorities access to European financial data through SWIFT, the banking consortium that handles global electronic banking transfers.

The new accord deals with the same data but sets limits on how and why it is shared.

The agreement also requires an EU official to be present when U.S. counterterrorism officials receive the data from banks.
Get the latest news alerts: at Twitter.

A roundup of the latest high-tech news “Hot Off the Wire” from The Associated Press and Local Tech Wire:

• Government plans to double available wireless spectrum

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration intends to nearly double the available amount of wireless communications spectrum over the next 10 years in an effort to keep up with the ever-growing demand for high-speed video and data transmission to cell phones, laptops and other mobile devices.

President Barack Obama on Monday committed the federal government to auctioning off 500 megahertz of federal and commercial spectrum. Revenue from the auctions would be spent on public safety, infrastructure investments and deficit reduction.

In a memo to heads of federal agencies and departments, Obama said he wanted to unleash the full potential of wireless broadband and spur innovation.

"This new era in global technology leadership will only happen if there is adequate spectrum available to support the forthcoming myriad of wireless devices, networks and applications that can drive the new economy," Obama wrote.

National Economic Council director Lawrence H. Summers was to explain the new policy in a speech Monday at the New America Foundation, a Washington think tank. In an excerpt released by the White House, Summers said the initiative could "help to create hundreds of thousands of jobs."

The administration said it hopes to encourage the spread of wireless broadband across the country, including rural areas. The auction is intended, in part, to counter fears of a potential "spectrum crunch" as smart phones and laptop computers become more popular and new wireless devices hit the market.

• Startup offers music roaming through ‘cloud’ computing

NEW YORK — A new music service launching Monday lets you listen to your music collection from any computer or Android phone over the Web.

service stores your music on its computers and lets you access it remotely through a Web browser. It’s a concept known as "cloud computing," and it’s also popular with music subscription services such as Rhapsody and Thumbplay.

MSpot is free for 2 gigabytes of music, or about 1,600 songs , and charges $3 to $14 for up to 100 gigabytes extra storage.

It detects cellular network conditions and adapts playback so that your tunes don’t get interrupted because of spotty coverage. An "airplane mode" allows you to play songs you’ve preselected, without Internet access.

• EU, U.S. settle on financial data in suspected terrorist cases

BRUSSELS — The European Union and U.S. signed a long-awaited deal Monday to share financial data in suspected terrorist cases, after the U.S. agreed to major concessions to allay European concerns over privacy.

The five-year agreement is due to take effect within weeks. It allows U.S. officials to request financial data from European banks if they suspect accounts are being used by individuals with terrorist links. The U.S. can keep that information for five years.

However, U.S. officials must provide European authorities with reasons for their suspicions, delete or rectify inaccurate data and grant legal redress in U.S. courts if financial information is abused. The agreement also sets out criteria for transferring data to third countries.

The accord is designed to head off disagreements between the U.S. and EU over where personal privacy takes precedence over security investigations. The European Parliament last year rejected extending an interim deal because it said there were not enough safeguards for civil liberties.

European officials were angered by the 2006 disclosure of the U.S. Terrorist Finance Tracking Program, a secret program launched after the 9/11 attacks that gave U.S. authorities access to European financial data through SWIFT, the banking consortium that handles global electronic banking transfers.

The new accord deals with the same data but sets limits on how and why it is shared.

The agreement also requires an EU official to be present when U.S. counterterrorism officials receive the data from banks.
Get the latest news alerts: at Twitter.

A roundup of the latest high-tech news “Hot Off the Wire” from The Associated Press and Local Tech Wire:

• Government plans to double available wireless spectrum

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration intends to nearly double the available amount of wireless communications spectrum over the next 10 years in an effort to keep up with the ever-growing demand for high-speed video and data transmission to cell phones, laptops and other mobile devices.

President Barack Obama on Monday committed the federal government to auctioning off 500 megahertz of federal and commercial spectrum. Revenue from the auctions would be spent on public safety, infrastructure investments and deficit reduction.

In a memo to heads of federal agencies and departments, Obama said he wanted to unleash the full potential of wireless broadband and spur innovation.

"This new era in global technology leadership will only happen if there is adequate spectrum available to support the forthcoming myriad of wireless devices, networks and applications that can drive the new economy," Obama wrote.

National Economic Council director Lawrence H. Summers was to explain the new policy in a speech Monday at the New America Foundation, a Washington think tank. In an excerpt released by the White House, Summers said the initiative could "help to create hundreds of thousands of jobs."

The administration said it hopes to encourage the spread of wireless broadband across the country, including rural areas. The auction is intended, in part, to counter fears of a potential "spectrum crunch" as smart phones and laptop computers become more popular and new wireless devices hit the market.

• Startup offers music roaming through ‘cloud’ computing

NEW YORK — A new music service launching Monday lets you listen to your music collection from any computer or Android phone over the Web.

service stores your music on its computers and lets you access it remotely through a Web browser. It’s a concept known as "cloud computing," and it’s also popular with music subscription services such as Rhapsody and Thumbplay.

MSpot is free for 2 gigabytes of music, or about 1,600 songs , and charges $3 to $14 for up to 100 gigabytes extra storage.

It detects cellular network conditions and adapts playback so that your tunes don’t get interrupted because of spotty coverage. An "airplane mode" allows you to play songs you’ve preselected, without Internet access.

• EU, U.S. settle on financial data in suspected terrorist cases

BRUSSELS — The European Union and U.S. signed a long-awaited deal Monday to share financial data in suspected terrorist cases, after the U.S. agreed to major concessions to allay European concerns over privacy.

The five-year agreement is due to take effect within weeks. It allows U.S. officials to request financial data from European banks if they suspect accounts are being used by individuals with terrorist links. The U.S. can keep that information for five years.

However, U.S. officials must provide European authorities with reasons for their suspicions, delete or rectify inaccurate data and grant legal redress in U.S. courts if financial information is abused. The agreement also sets out criteria for transferring data to third countries.

The accord is designed to head off disagreements between the U.S. and EU over where personal privacy takes precedence over security investigations. The European Parliament last year rejected extending an interim deal because it said there were not enough safeguards for civil liberties.

European officials were angered by the 2006 disclosure of the U.S. Terrorist Finance Tracking Program, a secret program launched after the 9/11 attacks that gave U.S. authorities access to European financial data through SWIFT, the banking consortium that handles global electronic banking transfers.

The new accord deals with the same data but sets limits on how and why it is shared.

The agreement also requires an EU official to be present when U.S. counterterrorism officials receive the data from banks.
Get the latest news alerts: at Twitter.

A roundup of the latest high-tech news “Hot Off the Wire” from The Associated Press and Local Tech Wire:

• Government plans to double available wireless spectrum

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration intends to nearly double the available amount of wireless communications spectrum over the next 10 years in an effort to keep up with the ever-growing demand for high-speed video and data transmission to cell phones, laptops and other mobile devices.

President Barack Obama on Monday committed the federal government to auctioning off 500 megahertz of federal and commercial spectrum. Revenue from the auctions would be spent on public safety, infrastructure investments and deficit reduction.

In a memo to heads of federal agencies and departments, Obama said he wanted to unleash the full potential of wireless broadband and spur innovation.

"This new era in global technology leadership will only happen if there is adequate spectrum available to support the forthcoming myriad of wireless devices, networks and applications that can drive the new economy," Obama wrote.

National Economic Council director Lawrence H. Summers was to explain the new policy in a speech Monday at the New America Foundation, a Washington think tank. In an excerpt released by the White House, Summers said the initiative could "help to create hundreds of thousands of jobs."

The administration said it hopes to encourage the spread of wireless broadband across the country, including rural areas. The auction is intended, in part, to counter fears of a potential "spectrum crunch" as smart phones and laptop computers become more popular and new wireless devices hit the market.

• Startup offers music roaming through ‘cloud’ computing

NEW YORK — A new music service launching Monday lets you listen to your music collection from any computer or Android phone over the Web.

service stores your music on its computers and lets you access it remotely through a Web browser. It’s a concept known as "cloud computing," and it’s also popular with music subscription services such as Rhapsody and Thumbplay.

MSpot is free for 2 gigabytes of music, or about 1,600 songs , and charges $3 to $14 for up to 100 gigabytes extra storage.

It detects cellular network conditions and adapts playback so that your tunes don’t get interrupted because of spotty coverage. An "airplane mode" allows you to play songs you’ve preselected, without Internet access.

• EU, U.S. settle on financial data in suspected terrorist cases

BRUSSELS — The European Union and U.S. signed a long-awaited deal Monday to share financial data in suspected terrorist cases, after the U.S. agreed to major concessions to allay European concerns over privacy.

The five-year agreement is due to take effect within weeks. It allows U.S. officials to request financial data from European banks if they suspect accounts are being used by individuals with terrorist links. The U.S. can keep that information for five years.

However, U.S. officials must provide European authorities with reasons for their suspicions, delete or rectify inaccurate data and grant legal redress in U.S. courts if financial information is abused. The agreement also sets out criteria for transferring data to third countries.

The accord is designed to head off disagreements between the U.S. and EU over where personal privacy takes precedence over security investigations. The European Parliament last year rejected extending an interim deal because it said there were not enough safeguards for civil liberties.

European officials were angered by the 2006 disclosure of the U.S. Terrorist Finance Tracking Program, a secret program launched after the 9/11 attacks that gave U.S. authorities access to European financial data through SWIFT, the banking consortium that handles global electronic banking transfers.

The new accord deals with the same data but sets limits on how and why it is shared.

The agreement also requires an EU official to be present when U.S. counterterrorism officials receive the data from banks.
Get the latest news alerts: at Twitter.

A roundup of the latest high-tech news “Hot Off the Wire” from The Associated Press and Local Tech Wire:

• Government plans to double available wireless spectrum

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration intends to nearly double the available amount of wireless communications spectrum over the next 10 years in an effort to keep up with the ever-growing demand for high-speed video and data transmission to cell phones, laptops and other mobile devices.

President Barack Obama on Monday committed the federal government to auctioning off 500 megahertz of federal and commercial spectrum. Revenue from the auctions would be spent on public safety, infrastructure investments and deficit reduction.

In a memo to heads of federal agencies and departments, Obama said he wanted to unleash the full potential of wireless broadband and spur innovation.

"This new era in global technology leadership will only happen if there is adequate spectrum available to support the forthcoming myriad of wireless devices, networks and applications that can drive the new economy," Obama wrote.

National Economic Council director Lawrence H. Summers was to explain the new policy in a speech Monday at the New America Foundation, a Washington think tank. In an excerpt released by the White House, Summers said the initiative could "help to create hundreds of thousands of jobs."

The administration said it hopes to encourage the spread of wireless broadband across the country, including rural areas. The auction is intended, in part, to counter fears of a potential "spectrum crunch" as smart phones and laptop computers become more popular and new wireless devices hit the market.

• Startup offers music roaming through ‘cloud’ computing

NEW YORK — A new music service launching Monday lets you listen to your music collection from any computer or Android phone over the Web.

service stores your music on its computers and lets you access it remotely through a Web browser. It’s a concept known as "cloud computing," and it’s also popular with music subscription services such as Rhapsody and Thumbplay.

MSpot is free for 2 gigabytes of music, or about 1,600 songs , and charges $3 to $14 for up to 100 gigabytes extra storage.

It detects cellular network conditions and adapts playback so that your tunes don’t get interrupted because of spotty coverage. An "airplane mode" allows you to play songs you’ve preselected, without Internet access.

• EU, U.S. settle on financial data in suspected terrorist cases

BRUSSELS — The European Union and U.S. signed a long-awaited deal Monday to share financial data in suspected terrorist cases, after the U.S. agreed to major concessions to allay European concerns over privacy.

The five-year agreement is due to take effect within weeks. It allows U.S. officials to request financial data from European banks if they suspect accounts are being used by individuals with terrorist links. The U.S. can keep that information for five years.

However, U.S. officials must provide European authorities with reasons for their suspicions, delete or rectify inaccurate data and grant legal redress in U.S. courts if financial information is abused. The agreement also sets out criteria for transferring data to third countries.

The accord is designed to head off disagreements between the U.S. and EU over where personal privacy takes precedence over security investigations. The European Parliament last year rejected extending an interim deal because it said there were not enough safeguards for civil liberties.

European officials were angered by the 2006 disclosure of the U.S. Terrorist Finance Tracking Program, a secret program launched after the 9/11 attacks that gave U.S. authorities access to European financial data through SWIFT, the banking consortium that handles global electronic banking transfers.

The new accord deals with the same data but sets limits on how and why it is shared.

The agreement also requires an EU official to be present when U.S. counterterrorism officials receive the data from banks.
Get the latest news alerts: at Twitter.

A roundup of the latest high-tech news “Hot Off the Wire” from The Associated Press and Local Tech Wire:

• Government plans to double available wireless spectrum

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration intends to nearly double the available amount of wireless communications spectrum over the next 10 years in an effort to keep up with the ever-growing demand for high-speed video and data transmission to cell phones, laptops and other mobile devices.

President Barack Obama on Monday committed the federal government to auctioning off 500 megahertz of federal and commercial spectrum. Revenue from the auctions would be spent on public safety, infrastructure investments and deficit reduction.

In a memo to heads of federal agencies and departments, Obama said he wanted to unleash the full potential of wireless broadband and spur innovation.

"This new era in global technology leadership will only happen if there is adequate spectrum available to support the forthcoming myriad of wireless devices, networks and applications that can drive the new economy," Obama wrote.

National Economic Council director Lawrence H. Summers was to explain the new policy in a speech Monday at the New America Foundation, a Washington think tank. In an excerpt released by the White House, Summers said the initiative could "help to create hundreds of thousands of jobs."

The administration said it hopes to encourage the spread of wireless broadband across the country, including rural areas. The auction is intended, in part, to counter fears of a potential "spectrum crunch" as smart phones and laptop computers become more popular and new wireless devices hit the market.

• Startup offers music roaming through ‘cloud’ computing

NEW YORK — A new music service launching Monday lets you listen to your music collection from any computer or Android phone over the Web.

service stores your music on its computers and lets you access it remotely through a Web browser. It’s a concept known as "cloud computing," and it’s also popular with music subscription services such as Rhapsody and Thumbplay.

MSpot is free for 2 gigabytes of music, or about 1,600 songs , and charges $3 to $14 for up to 100 gigabytes extra storage.

It detects cellular network conditions and adapts playback so that your tunes don’t get interrupted because of spotty coverage. An "airplane mode" allows you to play songs you’ve preselected, without Internet access.

• EU, U.S. settle on financial data in suspected terrorist cases

BRUSSELS — The European Union and U.S. signed a long-awaited deal Monday to share financial data in suspected terrorist cases, after the U.S. agreed to major concessions to allay European concerns over privacy.

The five-year agreement is due to take effect within weeks. It allows U.S. officials to request financial data from European banks if they suspect accounts are being used by individuals with terrorist links. The U.S. can keep that information for five years.

However, U.S. officials must provide European authorities with reasons for their suspicions, delete or rectify inaccurate data and grant legal redress in U.S. courts if financial information is abused. The agreement also sets out criteria for transferring data to third countries.

The accord is designed to head off disagreements between the U.S. and EU over where personal privacy takes precedence over security investigations. The European Parliament last year rejected extending an interim deal because it said there were not enough safeguards for civil liberties.

European officials were angered by the 2006 disclosure of the U.S. Terrorist Finance Tracking Program, a secret program launched after the 9/11 attacks that gave U.S. authorities access to European financial data through SWIFT, the banking consortium that handles global electronic banking transfers.

The new accord deals with the same data but sets limits on how and why it is shared.

The agreement also requires an EU official to be present when U.S. counterterrorism officials receive the data from banks.
Get the latest news alerts: at Twitter.

A roundup of the latest high-tech news “Hot Off the Wire” from The Associated Press and Local Tech Wire:

• Government plans to double available wireless spectrum

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration intends to nearly double the available amount of wireless communications spectrum over the next 10 years in an effort to keep up with the ever-growing demand for high-speed video and data transmission to cell phones, laptops and other mobile devices.

President Barack Obama on Monday committed the federal government to auctioning off 500 megahertz of federal and commercial spectrum. Revenue from the auctions would be spent on public safety, infrastructure investments and deficit reduction.

In a memo to heads of federal agencies and departments, Obama said he wanted to unleash the full potential of wireless broadband and spur innovation.

"This new era in global technology leadership will only happen if there is adequate spectrum available to support the forthcoming myriad of wireless devices, networks and applications that can drive the new economy," Obama wrote.

National Economic Council director Lawrence H. Summers was to explain the new policy in a speech Monday at the New America Foundation, a Washington think tank. In an excerpt released by the White House, Summers said the initiative could "help to create hundreds of thousands of jobs."

The administration said it hopes to encourage the spread of wireless broadband across the country, including rural areas. The auction is intended, in part, to counter fears of a potential "spectrum crunch" as smart phones and laptop computers become more popular and new wireless devices hit the market.

• Startup offers music roaming through ‘cloud’ computing

NEW YORK — A new music service launching Monday lets you listen to your music collection from any computer or Android phone over the Web.

service stores your music on its computers and lets you access it remotely through a Web browser. It’s a concept known as "cloud computing," and it’s also popular with music subscription services such as Rhapsody and Thumbplay.

MSpot is free for 2 gigabytes of music, or about 1,600 songs , and charges $3 to $14 for up to 100 gigabytes extra storage.

It detects cellular network conditions and adapts playback so that your tunes don’t get interrupted because of spotty coverage. An "airplane mode" allows you to play songs you’ve preselected, without Internet access.

• EU, U.S. settle on financial data in suspected terrorist cases

BRUSSELS — The European Union and U.S. signed a long-awaited deal Monday to share financial data in suspected terrorist cases, after the U.S. agreed to major concessions to allay European concerns over privacy.

The five-year agreement is due to take effect within weeks. It allows U.S. officials to request financial data from European banks if they suspect accounts are being used by individuals with terrorist links. The U.S. can keep that information for five years.

However, U.S. officials must provide European authorities with reasons for their suspicions, delete or rectify inaccurate data and grant legal redress in U.S. courts if financial information is abused. The agreement also sets out criteria for transferring data to third countries.

The accord is designed to head off disagreements between the U.S. and EU over where personal privacy takes precedence over security investigations. The European Parliament last year rejected extending an interim deal because it said there were not enough safeguards for civil liberties.

European officials were angered by the 2006 disclosure of the U.S. Terrorist Finance Tracking Program, a secret program launched after the 9/11 attacks that gave U.S. authorities access to European financial data through SWIFT, the banking consortium that handles global electronic banking transfers.

The new accord deals with the same data but sets limits on how and why it is shared.

The agreement also requires an EU official to be present when U.S. counterterrorism officials receive the data from banks.
Get the latest news alerts: at Twitter.

A roundup of the latest high-tech news “Hot Off the Wire” from The Associated Press and Local Tech Wire:

• Government plans to double available wireless spectrum

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration intends to nearly double the available amount of wireless communications spectrum over the next 10 years in an effort to keep up with the ever-growing demand for high-speed video and data transmission to cell phones, laptops and other mobile devices.

President Barack Obama on Monday committed the federal government to auctioning off 500 megahertz of federal and commercial spectrum. Revenue from the auctions would be spent on public safety, infrastructure investments and deficit reduction.

In a memo to heads of federal agencies and departments, Obama said he wanted to unleash the full potential of wireless broadband and spur innovation.

"This new era in global technology leadership will only happen if there is adequate spectrum available to support the forthcoming myriad of wireless devices, networks and applications that can drive the new economy," Obama wrote.

National Economic Council director Lawrence H. Summers was to explain the new policy in a speech Monday at the New America Foundation, a Washington think tank. In an excerpt released by the White House, Summers said the initiative could "help to create hundreds of thousands of jobs."

The administration said it hopes to encourage the spread of wireless broadband across the country, including rural areas. The auction is intended, in part, to counter fears of a potential "spectrum crunch" as smart phones and laptop computers become more popular and new wireless devices hit the market.

• Startup offers music roaming through ‘cloud’ computing

NEW YORK — A new music service launching Monday lets you listen to your music collection from any computer or Android phone over the Web.

service stores your music on its computers and lets you access it remotely through a Web browser. It’s a concept known as "cloud computing," and it’s also popular with music subscription services such as Rhapsody and Thumbplay.

MSpot is free for 2 gigabytes of music, or about 1,600 songs , and charges $3 to $14 for up to 100 gigabytes extra storage.

It detects cellular network conditions and adapts playback so that your tunes don’t get interrupted because of spotty coverage. An "airplane mode" allows you to play songs you’ve preselected, without Internet access.

• EU, U.S. settle on financial data in suspected terrorist cases

BRUSSELS — The European Union and U.S. signed a long-awaited deal Monday to share financial data in suspected terrorist cases, after the U.S. agreed to major concessions to allay European concerns over privacy.

The five-year agreement is due to take effect within weeks. It allows U.S. officials to request financial data from European banks if they suspect accounts are being used by individuals with terrorist links. The U.S. can keep that information for five years.

However, U.S. officials must provide European authorities with reasons for their suspicions, delete or rectify inaccurate data and grant legal redress in U.S. courts if financial information is abused. The agreement also sets out criteria for transferring data to third countries.

The accord is designed to head off disagreements between the U.S. and EU over where personal privacy takes precedence over security investigations. The European Parliament last year rejected extending an interim deal because it said there were not enough safeguards for civil liberties.

European officials were angered by the 2006 disclosure of the U.S. Terrorist Finance Tracking Program, a secret program launched after the 9/11 attacks that gave U.S. authorities access to European financial data through SWIFT, the banking consortium that handles global electronic banking transfers.

The new accord deals with the same data but sets limits on how and why it is shared.

The agreement also requires an EU official to be present when U.S. counterterrorism officials receive the data from banks.
Get the latest news alerts: at Twitter.

A roundup of the latest high-tech news “Hot Off the Wire” from The Associated Press and Local Tech Wire:

• Government plans to double available wireless spectrum

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration intends to nearly double the available amount of wireless communications spectrum over the next 10 years in an effort to keep up with the ever-growing demand for high-speed video and data transmission to cell phones, laptops and other mobile devices.

President Barack Obama on Monday committed the federal government to auctioning off 500 megahertz of federal and commercial spectrum. Revenue from the auctions would be spent on public safety, infrastructure investments and deficit reduction.

In a memo to heads of federal agencies and departments, Obama said he wanted to unleash the full potential of wireless broadband and spur innovation.

"This new era in global technology leadership will only happen if there is adequate spectrum available to support the forthcoming myriad of wireless devices, networks and applications that can drive the new economy," Obama wrote.

National Economic Council director Lawrence H. Summers was to explain the new policy in a speech Monday at the New America Foundation, a Washington think tank. In an excerpt released by the White House, Summers said the initiative could "help to create hundreds of thousands of jobs."

The administration said it hopes to encourage the spread of wireless broadband across the country, including rural areas. The auction is intended, in part, to counter fears of a potential "spectrum crunch" as smart phones and laptop computers become more popular and new wireless devices hit the market.

• Startup offers music roaming through ‘cloud’ computing

NEW YORK — A new music service launching Monday lets you listen to your music collection from any computer or Android phone over the Web.

service stores your music on its computers and lets you access it remotely through a Web browser. It’s a concept known as "cloud computing," and it’s also popular with music subscription services such as Rhapsody and Thumbplay.

MSpot is free for 2 gigabytes of music, or about 1,600 songs , and charges $3 to $14 for up to 100 gigabytes extra storage.

It detects cellular network conditions and adapts playback so that your tunes don’t get interrupted because of spotty coverage. An "airplane mode" allows you to play songs you’ve preselected, without Internet access.

• EU, U.S. settle on financial data in suspected terrorist cases

BRUSSELS — The European Union and U.S. signed a long-awaited deal Monday to share financial data in suspected terrorist cases, after the U.S. agreed to major concessions to allay European concerns over privacy.

The five-year agreement is due to take effect within weeks. It allows U.S. officials to request financial data from European banks if they suspect accounts are being used by individuals with terrorist links. The U.S. can keep that information for five years.

However, U.S. officials must provide European authorities with reasons for their suspicions, delete or rectify inaccurate data and grant legal redress in U.S. courts if financial information is abused. The agreement also sets out criteria for transferring data to third countries.

The accord is designed to head off disagreements between the U.S. and EU over where personal privacy takes precedence over security investigations. The European Parliament last year rejected extending an interim deal because it said there were not enough safeguards for civil liberties.

European officials were angered by the 2006 disclosure of the U.S. Terrorist Finance Tracking Program, a secret program launched after the 9/11 attacks that gave U.S. authorities access to European financial data through SWIFT, the banking consortium that handles global electronic banking transfers.

The new accord deals with the same data but sets limits on how and why it is shared.

The agreement also requires an EU official to be present when U.S. counterterrorism officials receive the data from banks.
Get the latest news alerts: at Twitter.

A roundup of the latest high-tech news “Hot Off the Wire” from The Associated Press and Local Tech Wire:

• Government plans to double available wireless spectrum

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration intends to nearly double the available amount of wireless communications spectrum over the next 10 years in an effort to keep up with the ever-growing demand for high-speed video and data transmission to cell phones, laptops and other mobile devices.

President Barack Obama on Monday committed the federal government to auctioning off 500 megahertz of federal and commercial spectrum. Revenue from the auctions would be spent on public safety, infrastructure investments and deficit reduction.

In a memo to heads of federal agencies and departments, Obama said he wanted to unleash the full potential of wireless broadband and spur innovation.

"This new era in global technology leadership will only happen if there is adequate spectrum available to support the forthcoming myriad of wireless devices, networks and applications that can drive the new economy," Obama wrote.

National Economic Council director Lawrence H. Summers was to explain the new policy in a speech Monday at the New America Foundation, a Washington think tank. In an excerpt released by the White House, Summers said the initiative could "help to create hundreds of thousands of jobs."

The administration said it hopes to encourage the spread of wireless broadband across the country, including rural areas. The auction is intended, in part, to counter fears of a potential "spectrum crunch" as smart phones and laptop computers become more popular and new wireless devices hit the market.

• Startup offers music roaming through ‘cloud’ computing

NEW YORK — A new music service launching Monday lets you listen to your music collection from any computer or Android phone over the Web.

service stores your music on its computers and lets you access it remotely through a Web browser. It’s a concept known as "cloud computing," and it’s also popular with music subscription services such as Rhapsody and Thumbplay.

MSpot is free for 2 gigabytes of music, or about 1,600 songs , and charges $3 to $14 for up to 100 gigabytes extra storage.

It detects cellular network conditions and adapts playback so that your tunes don’t get interrupted because of spotty coverage. An "airplane mode" allows you to play songs you’ve preselected, without Internet access.

• EU, U.S. settle on financial data in suspected terrorist cases

BRUSSELS — The European Union and U.S. signed a long-awaited deal Monday to share financial data in suspected terrorist cases, after the U.S. agreed to major concessions to allay European concerns over privacy.

The five-year agreement is due to take effect within weeks. It allows U.S. officials to request financial data from European banks if they suspect accounts are being used by individuals with terrorist links. The U.S. can keep that information for five years.

However, U.S. officials must provide European authorities with reasons for their suspicions, delete or rectify inaccurate data and grant legal redress in U.S. courts if financial information is abused. The agreement also sets out criteria for transferring data to third countries.

The accord is designed to head off disagreements between the U.S. and EU over where personal privacy takes precedence over security investigations. The European Parliament last year rejected extending an interim deal because it said there were not enough safeguards for civil liberties.

European officials were angered by the 2006 disclosure of the U.S. Terrorist Finance Tracking Program, a secret program launched after the 9/11 attacks that gave U.S. authorities access to European financial data through SWIFT, the banking consortium that handles global electronic banking transfers.

The new accord deals with the same data but sets limits on how and why it is shared.

The agreement also requires an EU official to be present when U.S. counterterrorism officials receive the data from banks.