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A roundup of the latest high-tech news “Hot Off the Wire” from The Associated Press and Local Tech Wire:

• FCC to check broadband delivery, provider promises

WASHINGTON – The Federal Communications Commission wants to find out whether broadband providers are delivering Internet connections that are as fast as advertised.

The FCC is seeking 10,000 volunteers to take part in a study of residential broadband speeds. Specialized equipment will be installed in homes to measure Internet connections. Those results will then be compared with advertised speeds. The agency hopes to get a cross section of volunteers who subscribe to broadband services provided by a range of phone and cable TV companies.

The new project grows out of several proposals outlined in the FCC’s , released in March.

According to data cited in the national broadband plan, average residential download speeds are typically only half as fast as the maximum speeds advertised by U.S. broadband providers.

• Troubled high-tech gear maker raises worker wages

TAIPEI, Taiwan — Taiwan’s Foxconn Technology Group, shaken by a spate of suicides at its China plants, said Wednesday it is raising the pay of workers by 30 percent, a greater increase than first planned.

The company, which makes iPhones, iPads and other electronic gadgets, said the pay increase will take effect immediately at its plants across China. Foxconn, part of Taiwan’s Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., is the world’s largest contract maker of electronics. Its long list of big-name customers include Apple Inc., Sony Corp., Dell Inc., Nokia Corp. and Hewlett-Packard Co.

"With the pay raise, we hope workers don’t need to work overtime as much and thus gain more time for leisure and have a happier working environment," said a Foxconn official who asked for anonymity because he was not an authorized spokesman.

The basic salary at Foxconn’s China plants is currently about 900 yuan ($130) per month.

Foxconn had been considering raising pay for months to cope with a labor shortage following China’s recovery from the global recession. The eventual raise is higher than the 20 percent the company had initially planned.

Ten workers have killed themselves and three have attempted suicide at Foxconn’s operations in southern China this year, involving mainly workers who jumped from buildings.

• GPS glitch shows threat to U.S. military, expert says

DENVER — A problem that rendered as many as 10,000 U.S. military GPS receivers useless for days is a warning to safeguard a system that enemies would love to disrupt, a defense expert says.

The Air Force has not said how many weapons, planes or other systems were affected or whether any were in use in Iraq or Afghanistan. But the problem, blamed on incompatible software, highlights the military’s reliance on the Global Positioning System and the need to protect technology that has become essential for protecting troops, tracking vehicles and targeting weapons.

"Everything that moves uses it," said John Pike, director of Globalsecurity.org, which tracks military and homeland security news. "It is so central to the American style of war that you just couldn’t leave home without it."

The problem occurred when new software was installed in ground control systems for GPS satellites on Jan. 11, the Air Force said. Officials said between 8,000 at 10,000 receivers could have been affected, out of more than 800,000 in use across the military.

In a series of e-mails to The Associated Press, the Air Force initially blamed a contractor for defective software in the affected receivers but later said it was a compatibility issue rather than a defect. The Air Force didn’t immediately respond to a request for clarification.