Get the latest news alerts: at Twitter.

A roundup of the latest high-tech news “Hot Off the Wire” from The Associated Press and Local Tech Wire:

• Adobe launches ad campaign in Apple dispute

NEW YORK — Adobe is firing back at Apple with love.

Adobe Systems Inc. (Nasdaq: ADBE) is countering Apple Inc. (Nasdaq: AAPL) CEO Steve Jobs’ recent jab at Adobe’s Flash technology for Web video and games. Jobs had described Flash as buggy and unfit for Apple’s iPhone and iPad gadgets.

Adobe is running advertisements in major newspapers saying "We Love Apple" – with a bright red heart in place of love.

The ad begins, "We love creativity," "We love innovation," "We love apps."

"What we don’t love," it continues, "is anybody taking away your freedom to choose what you create, how you create it, and what you experience on the Web."

Adobe co-founders Chuck Geschke and John Warnock, highly regarded in Silicon Valley, also posted a statement criticizing Apple.

Apple did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

• Taiwan phone maker files own suit against Apple

SEATTLE — Taiwanese cell phone maker HTC Corp. is filing a patent complaint against Apple Inc. over its popular gadgets, escalating a legal dispute as new smart phones are threatening the iPhone’s supremacy.

HTC, which makes the Droid Incredible and other phones running competing Android software from Google Inc., filed a complaint with the U.S. International Trade Commission on Wednesday seeking to block U.S. sales of the iPhone, iPod and iPad devices.

Apple filed its own lawsuits against HTC in March, saying HTC’s cell phones violate 20 of Apple’s iPhone patents. Apple’s complaints were made before the trade commission and in U.S. District Court in Wilmington, Del.

None of the complaints is likely to block sales of any products any time soon. Patent disputes are common among technology companies and often take years to resolve. The cases often lead to licensing agreements rather than outright bans on imports, as HTC is seeking in its complaint. Apple’s products are typically made overseas.

The wild success of the first iPhone, which launched in 2007, prompted other cell phone makers to rush out touch-screen smart phones of their own in a bid to lure consumers, not just business users attached to their BlackBerry phones.

At the end of 2009, iPhones made up about 14 percent of smart phones sold worldwide, according to the research group Gartner Inc. Apple closed the gap with BlackBerry maker Research in Motion Ltd., which had 20 percent of sales. But Android phones, while accounting for only 4 percent of sales, grew at a faster rate than Apple last year.

In the filing, HTC said Apple violates five patents. In one, the technology helps prolong battery life by letting the phone system operate independently from the gadget’s other functions. The phone might be in "sleep" mode while other programs are active.

In another, stored information is moved between different kinds of memory depending on how much juice is left in the battery.

The other three patents relate to how the phones store numbers, then look them up and dial them.

• Possible next-gen iPhone surfaces on Vietnam sites

SEATTLE — Another possible next-generation iPhone prototype has surfaced, this time in Vietnam.

U.S. blogs reposted video of someone holding the phone and photos of it being taken apart. The original Vietnamese Web sites could not be accessed Wednesday afternoon.

The iPhone looks similar to one found in a Silicon Valley bar recently. That was sold to Gizmodo.com, a gadget blog, in April for $5,000.

Apple Inc. is notoriously secretive about unfinished products. It confirmed it owned the Gizmodo phone, but did not say it was the next iPhone. Analysts expect a new model in June.

After Gizmodo returned the phone, law enforcement searched the blogger’s home and seized computers. A dispute over the legality of a search warrant is ongoing in California.