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A roundup of the latest high-tech news “Hot Off the Wire” from The Associated Press and Local Tech Wire:

• Twitter bug lets users fake followers

SAN JOSE, Calif. — A glitch has allowed users to game the popularity contest by making it appear that celebrities had subscribed to read their mini-blog postings known as tweets.

The flaw, which Twitter said Monday it has fixed, allowed users to add anyone else as a follower of their tweets. Normally, the other person has to initiate such "following."

It’s unclear how long the flaw existed and how many people took advantage of it. Twitter Inc. says it’s looking at the issue.

A side effect of the fix was that for about an hour on Monday, Twitter users showed zero followers while the company fixed the problem.

People who exploited the bug got more than an ego boost from having famous people appear to be their fans. For a time, those celebrities really did become their audience and received the tweets from people who had fraudulently added them as followers.

Twitter recommends that users who were fraudulently added as a follower to someone else’s account should click "unfollow" to take themselves off those lists.

• Sprint scraps plans for Google’s Nexus One phone

SAN FRANCISCO — (NYSE: S) has had a change of heart and scrapped its plans to back Google’s Nexus One mobile phone.

The reversal announced Monday marks the second major carrier to spurn the Nexus One in the past two weeks. Google recently informed consumers the Nexus One won’t be available on Verizon Wireless’ network, the most widely used in the U.S.

Sprint embraced the Nexus One less than two month ago, but backed off after concluding another new phone called the Evo would be a better choice for its customers, said spokeswoman Michelle Leff Mermelstein.

Like the Nexus One, the Evo is made by HTC and relies on Google’s Android operating system.

The Nexus One, which Google designed as a challenger to Apple’s iPhone, currently works on the U.S. wireless networks of T-Mobile and AT&T. Both Verizon and Sprint rely on a different technology to run their networks.

• Dish Network faces DVR shutdown, 1Q profit falls

NEW YORK – (Nasdaq: DISH) reported a 26 percent drop in first-quarter net income as the satellite TV company stepped up promotions to reel in customers.

Its CEO also warned the company may shut down millions of digital video recorders in a dispute with TiVo Inc.

Dish CEO Charlie Ergen said Monday that he’s prepared to shut down the DVRs if a court sides with TiVo in a patent-infringement case. The alternative is to pay TiVo, a pioneer in DVR technology, licensing fees.

"The only thing we can control is to shut down boxes, so we have to, obviously, if we were to lose in the court procedures," he told analysts during a conference call on the company’s earnings. "We’re prepared to do that. That obviously will have a material negative effect on our business."

Sanford Bernstein analyst Craig Moffett said that 7.3 million DVRs could be affected and that the cost to replace and shut down the boxes could run close to $3 billion.