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A roundup of the latest high-tech news from The Associated Press:

• Sun acquisition costs cut Oracle profit

SAN FRANCISCO — Oracle Corp.’s (Nasdaq: ORCL) profit fell 10.5 percent in the latest quarter as the business software maker absorbed Sun Microsystems and its expenses for building and supporting computer servers.

Still, Oracle’s profit edged past Wall Street’s estimates and its revenue from new software licenses ratcheted higher for the second quarter in a row. That is an encouraging sign that big companies are steadily increasing their spending on new technology projects.

New licenses are key for Oracle, the world’s No. 1 maker of database software, because customers often lock into technical-support contracts that fuel Oracle’s growth for years down the road. Oracle gets more than half its total revenue from those contracts.

Oracle said after the market closed Thursday that its net income was $1.2 billion, or 23 cents per share, in the three months ended Feb. 28. That compares with $1.3 billion, or 26 cents per share, in the year-ago period.

Revenue jumped 17 percent to $6.4 billion.

Excluding one-time items, the company earned 38 cents per share. On that basis, analysts polled by Thomson Reuters had expected Oracle to earn 37 cents per share, on $6.3 billion in revenue.

The latest numbers include about a month of contributions from Sun Microsystems, the struggling server and software maker that Oracle bought for $7.4 billion as part of Oracle CEO Larry Ellison’s push to more deeply challenge rival IBM Corp. The deal was completed in January after months of wrangling in Europe over whether the deal would violate antitrust laws.

Oracle said that without Sun its revenue would have risen 7 percent. Oracle also said it expects Sun to make a "significant contribution" to its profit in the current quarter.

• ‘I’m a nice hacker,’ says Twitter suspect

PARIS — He’s unemployed and isn’t much of a computer expert. The Frenchman accused of infiltrating Twitter and peeping at the accounts of President Barack Obama and singers Britney Spears and Lily Allen says he wanted to reveal just how vulnerable online data systems are to break-ins — and he says he didn’t mean any harm.

"I’m a nice hacker," suspect Francois Cousteix told France 3 television Thursday, a day after he was released from police questioning, adding that his goal was to warn Internet users about data security.

"Hacker Croll," as he was known online, is accused of breaking into Twitter administrators’ accounts and copying confidential data — as well as peeping at Obama’s and the singers’ accounts, though he didn’t have access to sensitive information about them, a French prosecutor said.

FBI agents sat in on the sessions while French police questioned the young man for two days, said Jean-Yves Coquillat, prosecutor in Clermont-Ferrand, where the suspect will be tried in June for hacking.

If convicted on the charge of breaking into a data system, he risks up to two years in prison and a €30,000 ($40,068) fine. The suspect lives near Clermont-Ferrand in central France.

"He says it’s the challenge, the game, that made him do it," Coquillat said. Officials say preliminary investigations suggest Hacker Croll did not tweet in other peoples’ names or try to make money out of his information.

"He had access to elements that were so confidential that he could very well have profited from them" through blackmail, for example, said Adeline Champagnat of the French police office on information technology crimes.

She compared the hacker’s actions to "a burglar breaking into the headquarters of a big company, able to look at the files of the all employees and clients, with their passwords and confidential information."

"In a way, he succeeded in taking control of Twitter," Champagnat said.

• HP names new Canadian CEO

NEW YORK — Technology company Hewlett-Packard Co. (NYSE: HP) said Thursday it named Peter Galanis as president and CEO of its Canadian operations.

Galanis, 43, previously served as director of global accounts for HP’s manufacturing and distribution industries business in the central region of the country. He joined HP in 2006 after serving in various sales and marketing positions at EMC, Xerox and Sun Microsystems.

Galanis replaces Paul Tsaparis, who has led HP Canada since 1998. Tsaparis will become vice president of technology support for HP Enterprise Business in the Americas region. He will be responsible for driving growth of HP’s technology support offerings in the region