Recession? What recession? That’s what the vast majority of employers in Durham seem to be saying when it comes to needing workers.

A net 80 percent of companies in the Bull City tell employment agency Manpower that they plan to add workers in the second quarter of this year. According to the national Manpower report, that’s among the best in the nation.

However, job prospects in Raleigh and Fayetteville are not as strong.

While 13 percent of Raleigh firms surveyed said they plan to add workers, another 20 percent are planning cutbacks.

In Fayetteville, only 3 percent of companies are looking to hire while 10 percent plan to make cuts.

The Greenville and Rocky Mount markets are among the best in the state with a net 40 percent and 20 percent of companies looking to add workers, Manpower says.

Overall, 13 percent of North Carolina firms are looking to hire.

Net job prospects are down 6 percent in Charlotte, 26 percent in Greensboro and 3 percent in Winston-Salem.

Jeff Stocks, spokesperson for Manpower in the Triangle, noted that the Durham market has been strong for two consecutive quarters even as the U.S. economy has slowed.

“Compared with the first quarter of 2008, when 55 percent of companies interviewed intended to add employees and none planned to reduce staff levels, area hiring levels appear to be significantly stronger,” Stocks said. “Employers are much more optimistic about hiring activity as compared to one year ago, when 27 percent of companies surveyed planned to increase staff levels and none expected to cut payrolls.”

Job-seekers have the best chances of landing work in construction, manufacturing of durable and non-durable goods, wholesale and retail trade, finance, insurance and real estate, education, services and public administration, according to the survey.

In Raleigh, Manpower described the job market as “sluggish.”

“Compared with the first quarter of 2008, when 10 percent of companies interviewed intended to add employees and 13 percent planned to reduce staff levels, area hiring levels appear to be weaker,” Stocks said. “Employers are less optimistic about hiring activity as compared to one year ago, when none of companies surveyed planned to increase staff levels and none expected to cut payrolls.”

Best job opportunities are in non-durable goods manufacturing, Manpower reported.